Teaching your child to read

Dana

Member
Joined
Jan 9, 2020
Messages
17
I have found that old materials work the best with kids who have special needs. For reading I have found the McGuffey Readers to be invaluable. There is a free website called under The Home that has the readers all broken up for ease of use. Here's the link.
 

momschool

Member
Joined
Jan 14, 2020
Messages
16
I think this would great for a kid who struggles! You need to read the teacher tips at the back of the book but I love how systematic it is and how it incorporates different things. http://www.donpotter.net/pdf/word_mastery_typed.pdf Beyond that I would try all about reading as they have the orton gillingham approach that is very successful for dyslexic kids.
 

Allyk45

Member
Joined
Jan 10, 2020
Messages
6
All About Reading is supposed to work well for kiddos with dyslexia. My daughter has a mild form of it and through research I choose AAR. So far it seems to be helping!
 

SLA

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
Dec 17, 2018
Messages
40
All About Reading is supposed to be good for kids with Dyslexia. We use it and love it (although my kids aren't dyslexic, so I can't say how well it works in that instance, but it advertising that it is good for kids with dyslexia).

This is my referral link for AAR - https://www.allaboutlearningpress.net/go.php?id=693_2_1_313

Another good resource for homeschooling in general when your child is dyslexic is Homeschooling with Dyslexia. Marianne from Homeschooling with Dyslexia is a homeschool mama of 8 kids, 7 of which have dyslexia. She has a lot of wisdom to share. And I just noticed on her home page that she has a FREE 50-page guide to choosing the best dyslexia-friendly homeschool curriculum! (referral link) - https://homeschoolingwithdyslexia.com/ref/36/
 

Angcobb28

Active member
Joined
Jan 11, 2020
Messages
29
Sarah Janisse Brown is the creator of The Thinking Tree journals for what she coined,"Funschooling", being Dyslexic herself and homeschooling a few of her 14 children who were also dyslexic, she has a very unique way of approaching the curriculum she created. The link below takes you directly to her page, where she has created Dyslexia games. Below the link, is the text from her actual page, which I thought gives a pretty good idea of her view of Dyslexia and an overview of the games. I hope this helps!


If a child does not learn the way we teach, we should teach the way they learn.

These mind training games are different from EVERYTHING you have ever tried because they focus on your student's TALENTS, not their weaknesses!

Dyslexia Games is a series of workbooks packed with learning activities that empower your student's brain with new abilities and new brain connections for literacy. Even older children, teens and adults who have been struggling for a long time can quickly build the mental skills needed to succeed in reading, writing and spelling!

The games are so intuitive that student will rarely need help from parents or teachers! This makes your job easy! Just use the books in order, and watch your student thrive! Before long he will be able to move on to normal schoolwork without the mental confusion caused by Dyslexia.

With Dyslexia Games there is NO grueling memorization, NO flash cards, NO boring text books and NO endless repetition of the same dull facts! Just fun and games for 15 to 20 minutes a day!
 

Carla

Member
Joined
Jan 1, 2020
Messages
24
All About Reading has worked well for our kids who are dyslexic. I love the hands-on, multi-sensory approach. Two other things that have been super helpful for us, especially when they were first figuring things out: 1- SHORT lessons! Reading is hard work on those little brains, and it can literally hurt their heads, so... break it up. :) I would do 2-4 reading lessons throughout the day, and each lesson would be 5-10 minutes long. 2- Let them choose reading material. If they want to read picture books that they've basically memorized from their preschool and toddler years, that is excellent (and in our case it was super helpful)! Finally (sorry, more than 2), keep it fun! If it is painful or awful or your kiddo is crying, they aren't learning and it won't help in the long run. Every kid is different, and what will help them enjoy the process will vary a ton, but make it a priority. <3 And fwiw, dyslexic kids can totally learn to read very well! I'm slightly dyslexic, and my two oldest both seem to be as well. They are both now reading well above grade level.
 
Top